I am interested in memory, and how people make decisions based upon their memorial experiences. I have an interest in ‘basic’ face recognition/perception, as well as a more applied interest in eyewitness identification. I am also interested in metacognition – i.e., ‘thinking about thinking’ – particularly as it relates to the confidence people express about their memory-based decisions, and the relationship that confidence has to accuracy.

Areas of Expertise

  • Cognitive Psychology
  • Memory
  • Eyewitness Identification
  • Face Recognition

Publications

  1. Horry, R., Fitzgerald, R., & Mansour, J. (n.d.) “Only your first yes will count”: The impact of pre-lineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied
  2. Rudd, J., Horry, R., & Skains, R. You and CO2: a Public Engagement Study to Engage Secondary School Students with the Issue of Climate Change. Journal of Science Education and Technology
  3. Bryant, E., Williams, C., Horry, R., & Worthington, A. Measuring misconceptions about traumatic brain injury: are existing scales misconceived?. Brain Injury, 34(9), 1150-1158.
  4. Horry, R., Brewer, N., & Weber, N. The grain-size lineup: A test of a novel eyewitness identification procedure.. Law and Human Behavior, 40(2), 147-158.
  5. Horry, R. & Brewer, N. How target–lure similarity shapes confidence judgments in multiple-alternative decision tasks.. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145(12), 1615-1634.

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Teaching

  • PS-M84 Investigative Psychology

    This module will explore the application of psychology to police investigations. We will discuss how our theoretical understanding of human cognition, including perception, memory, and decision-making, have led to changes in police procedure that have improved the reliability of the investigative process. Specific topics will include: Eyewitness testimony and identification; False confessions; Detecting deception; and cognitive biases in forensic evidence processing.

  • PSA100 Academic Skills and Foundational Concepts in Statistics and Research Methods (Joint Honours)

    This module will introduce Psychology students to foundational concepts in statistics and research methods. Students will be introduced to the British Psychological Society¿s ethical principles, and will explore ethics in research through the study of historical case studies of problematic research. This module will cover experimental and observational research designs, and how we can measure psychological constructs such as traits, attitudes, and emotions. Students will receive a solid grounding in statistical theory, and will learn to summarise, present, analyse, and interpret data. Additionally, through small group sessions led by their Personal Academic Mentor, students will develop key academic skills, including literature searching, essay planning and writing, oral presentation skills, making use of feedback, and academic referencing.

  • PSY100 Academic Skills and Foundational Concepts in Statistics and Research Methods

    This module will introduce Psychology students to foundational concepts in statistics and research methods. Students will be introduced to the British Psychological society¿s ethical principles, and will explore ethics in research through the study of historical case studies of problematic research. This module will cover experimental and observational research designs, and how we can measure psychological constructs such as traits, attitudes, and emotions. Students will receive a solid grounding in statistical theory, and will learn to summarise, present, analyse, and interpret data. Additionally, through small group sessions led by their Personal Academic Mentor, students will develop key academic skills, including literature searching, essay planning and writing, oral presentation skills, making use of feedback, and academic referencing.

  • PSY319 Final Year Independent Research Project

    Students conduct an independent research project under the supervision of a member of staff. The research topic is decided in conjunction with supervisors and Research topics. Students must design, conduct, analyse and write up a piece of research in order to achieve Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society (BPS). They must also complete an Ethical Considerations Form, showing that they have considered and resolved ethical issues relating to their project.

  • PSY325 Independent Research Project - Joint Honours

    Students conduct an independent research project under the supervision of a member of staff. The research topic is decided in conjunction with supervisors and research topics. Students must design, conduct, analyse and write up a piece of research in order to achieve Graduate Basis for Chartership with the British Psychological Society (BPS). They must also complete an ethical considerations form, showing that they have considered and resolved ethical issues relating to their project.

Supervision

  • The Influence of Psychopathy on Juror Decision-making (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Claire Williams
  • Assessing the validity, utility and value of individual case formulation in the Offender Personality Disorder Pathway (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Prof Jason Davies
  • Mock jury perceptions of defendants with acquired brain injury (current)

    PhD
    Other supervisor: Dr Claire Williams

External Responsibilities

  • Member, Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition

    2018 - Present

  • Member, American Psychology-Law Society

    2018 - Present